Final Projects 2010 « Computation + Journalism Class at Georgia Tech

April 1st, 2010 Irfan Essa Posted in CnJ, Computational Journalism, Teaching No Comments »

Final Projects 2010 « Computation + Journalism Class at Georgia Tech.

Check out the list of final projects for this term’s (Spring 2010) class on Computational Journalism.  Final reports expected in last week of April.  Stay tuned.

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Classes for Spring 2010

January 11th, 2010 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Teaching No Comments »

Happy 2010! In Spring Term 2010, I am teaching the following two classes.

Computation + Journalism (CS 4464 / CS 6465)

This class is aimed at understanding the computational and technological advancements in the area of journalism. Primary focus is on the study of technologies for developing new tools for (a) sense-making from diverse news information sources, (b) the impact of more and cheaper networked sensors (c) collaborative human models for information aggregation and sense-making, (d) mashups and the use of programming in journalism, (e) the impact of mobile computing and data gathering, (f) computational approaches to information quality, (g) data mining for personalization and aggregation, and (h) citizen journalism.

Computing, Society and Professionalism (CS 4001)

Although Computing, Society and Professionalism is a required course for CS majors, it is not a typical computer science course. Rather than dealing with the technical content of computing, it addresses the effects of computing on individuals, organizations, and society, and on what yourresponsibilities are as a computing professional in light of those impacts. The topic is a very broad one and one that you will have to deal with almost every day of your professional life. The issues are sometimes as intellectually deep as some of the greatest philosophical writings in history – and sometimes as shallow as a report on the evening TV news. This course can do little more than introduce you to the topics, but, if successful, will change the way you view the technology with which you work.

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Paper ISMAR 2009: “Augmenting Aerial Earth Maps with Dynamic Information”

October 20th, 2009 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Computational Photography and Video, Kihwan Kim, Modeling and Animation, Papers No Comments »

Augmenting Aerial Earth Maps with Dynamic Information

  • K. Kim, S. Oh, J. Lee, and I. Essa (2009), “Augmenting Aerial Earth Maps with Dynamic Information,” in Proceedings of IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR), 2009. [PDF] [WEBSITE] [VIDEO] [DOI] [BLOG] [BIBTEX]
    @InProceedings{    2009-Kim-AAEMWDI,
      author  = {K. Kim and S. Oh and J. Lee and I. Essa},
      blog    = {http://prof.irfanessa.com/2009/10/20/augearth-ismar2009/},
      booktitle  = {Proceedings of IEEE International Symposium on
          Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR)},
      doi    = {10.1109/ISMAR.2009.5336505},
      month    = {October},
      pdf    = {http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~irfan/p/2009-Kim-AAEMWDI.pdf},
      title    = {Augmenting Aerial Earth Maps with Dynamic
          Information},
      url    = {http://www.cc.gatech.edu/cpl/projects/augearth/},
      video    = {http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPk88soc2qw},
      year    = {2009}
    }

Abstract

We introduce methods for augmenting aerial visualizations of Earth (from tools such as Google Earth or Microsoft Virtual Earth) with dynamic information obtained from videos. Our goal is to make Augmented Earth Maps that visualize the live broadcast of dynamic sceneries within a city. We propose different approaches to analyze videos of pedestrians and cars, under differing conditions and then augment Aerial Earth Maps (AEMs) with live and dynamic information. We also analyze natural phenomenon (clouds) and project information from these to the AEMs to add the visual reality.

For Journal Version of this paper, please see http://prof.irfanessa.com/2011/02/02/vr-2011/

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

N. Diakopoulos PhD Thesis (2009): Collaborative annotation, analysis, and presentation interfaces for digital video”

July 6th, 2009 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Computational Photography and Video, Multimedia, Nick Diakopoulos, PhD, Students No Comments »

Title: Collaborative annotation, analysis, and presentation interfaces for digital video

Author: Diakopoulos, Nicholas A.

Abstract

Information quality corresponds to the degree of excellence in communicating knowledge or intelligence and encompasses aspects of validity, accuracy, reliability, bias, transparency, and comprehensiveness among others. Professional news, public relations, and user generated content alike all have their own subtly different information quality concerns. With so much recent growth in online video, it is also apparent that more and more consumers will be getting their information from online videos and that understanding the information quality of video becomes paramount for a consumer wanting to make decisions based on it.

This dissertation explores the design and evaluation of collaborative video annotation and presentation interfaces as motivated by the desire for better information quality in online video. We designed, built, and evaluated three systems: (1) Audio Puzzler, a puzzle game which as a by-product of play produces highly accurate time-stamped transcripts of video, (2) Videolyzer, a video annotation system designed to aid bloggers and journalists collect, aggregate, and share analyses of information quality of video, and (3) Videolyzer CE, a simplified video annotation presentation which syndicates the knowledge collected using Videolyzer to a wider range of users in order to modulate their perceptions of video information. We contribute to knowledge of different interface methods for collaborative video annotation and to mechanisms for enhancing accuracy of objective metadata such as transcripts as well as subjective notions of information quality of the video itself.

via Collaborative annotation, analysis, and presentation interfaces for digital video.

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Time Magazine (2009) Article “Can Computer Nerds Save Journalism?”

June 8th, 2009 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, In The News, Interesting No Comments »

Can Computer Nerds Save Journalism?, TIME Magazine, by MATT VILLANO, June 8, 2009

EXCERPT

“At the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, a three-year-old program in “computational journalism” helps computer-science majors study how journalists gather, organize and utilize information, then take these workflows and see how technology can make the processes easier.”

Full article here. Also see CnJ site.

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Presentation at CMU’s Computational Thinking Seminar Series (2009): “From Computational Photography and Video to Computational Journalism”

March 10th, 2009 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Computational Photography and Video, Presentations 1 Comment »

From Computational Photography and Video to Computational Journalism

Irfan Essa
Georgia Institute of Technology
School of Interactive Computing, GVU and RIM Centers
April 21, 2009.

(see the video of this presentation)

Abstract

essa_poster_b

Our consumption of images (photography/video) continues to grow with the pervasiveness of computing (networking, mobile and media) technologies into our daily lives. Everyone now has a mobile camera, and digital image capture, processing, and sharing has become ubiquitous in our society. This has led to a significant impact on we want to (a) create novel scenes, (b) share our experiences with images, and (c) interact with  large amounts of images and videos from many sources. In this talk, I will start  with a brief overview of series of ongoing efforts in the analysis of images and videos for rendering novel scenes, interacting with images/videos and collaboratively authoring new content. I will describe some work on video-based rendering and synthesizing novel videos (and scenes) and highlight the technical contributions being made in areas of Computational Photography and Video.

Using these sets of efforts as a foundation I will showcase where things are headed in terms of user generated content, media sharing, annotation, and reuse with large scale networks. In essence, everybody is a content, producer, distributor, and consumer. I will describe some new efforts that move towards understanding mobile imaging and video, and also discuss issues of collaborative imaging, collective authoring, ad-hoc sensor networks, and peer production with images and videos.  Using these concepts I will discuss how all of these issues are impacting the field Journalism and Reporting and how we have started on a new interdisciplinary research and education effort, we call Computational Journalism.  The concept of Computational Journalism includes more than just imaging, and relates to media and information in general and is aimed at the study of how we remain informed in this connected world. I will outline this new field and relate it back to imaging, with examples from some of our recent work in this new area.

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Paper (2009) ACM CHI: “Videolyzer: Quality Analysis of Online Informational Video for Bloggers and Journalists”

March 4th, 2009 Irfan Essa Posted in ACM UIST/CHI, Computational Journalism, Computational Photography and Video, Nick Diakopoulos No Comments »

N. Diakopoulos, S. Goldenberg, I. Essa (2009). “Videolyzer: Quality Analysis of Online Informational Video for Bloggers and Journalists.” ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI). April, 2009. [PDF] [Project Site] [Video(CHI 2009 – Digital Life New World – CHI 2009 Advance Program)

Abstract

Screen Shot of Videolyzer

Tools to aid people in making sense of the information quality of online informational video are essential for media consumers seeking to be well informed. Our application, Videolyzer, addresses the information quality problem in video by allowing politically motivated bloggers or journalists to analyze, collect, and share criticisms of the information quality of online political videos. Our interface innovates by providing a fine-grained and tightly coupled interaction paradigm between the timeline, the time-synced transcript, and annotations. We also incorporate automatic textual and video content analysis to suggest areas of interest for further assessment by a person. We present an evaluation of Videolyzer looking at the user experience, usefulness, and behavior around the novel features of the UI as well as report on the collaborative dynamic of the discourse generated with the tool.
AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Presentation at Duke University (2009): “Computation & Journalism: The Impact of Technology on Journalism, Information Quality, and Civic Literacy”

January 10th, 2009 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Presentations 2 Comments »

Talk/Presentation at Duke University, Jan 27, 2009. Hosted by  James Hamilton, director of the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy at Duke University

Computation & Journalism: The Impact of Technology on Journalism, Information Quality, and Civic Literacy

Irfan Essa
Georgia Institute of Technology
School of Interactive Computing, GVU and RIM Centers 

Fundamentally, journalism is the process of collecting news information and disseminating that information with a layer of contextualization and understanding provided by journalists in the form of a news story. Recent advances in computational technology are rapidly affecting how news is gathered, reported, and distributed, and how stories are authored and told. New technologies for aggregating, visualizing, summarizing, consuming, and collaborating on news are becoming increasingly popular. Theses advances are challenging the traditional practices of journalism and directly affecting the future of news production and consumption. Both computation and journalism share a deep interest in information and the value it provides to society, and they are deeply involved in the future of storytelling in various contexts, especially current events. This requires us to consider how both Computation and Journalism can help each other.

In this talk, I will present a vision for a new area of research and education that brings together the fields of computation and journalism together to enhance both these disciplines and supports a creation of a “Computationalist-Journalist.,” a new kind of participant in the public conversation. I will start by describing how imaging, video, and media production and consumption has changed with technology and then how similar technologies can be used for Journalism and related Civic Literacy issues. I will describe new technologies that have changed the landscape of both Computation and Journalism and use these developments to showcase, where we are headed to with both Computation and Journalism, and technologists and journalists together to create new computing tools that further the aims of journalism.

Bio

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

INTERESTING: “Deep Throat Meets Data Mining”

December 24th, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, In The News, Interesting No Comments »

“Deep Throat Meets Data Mining”

by JOHN MECKLIN

Dec 23, 2008 in Miller-McCune

If you pay passing attention to the media landscape, you know that most mainstream news outlets have had their business models undermined by the digital revolution. As their general-interest monopolies have been pillaged by niche online competitors, traditional news organizations have lost revenue and cachet, laying off journalists in waves that have grown into tsunamis. This process has created dire prospects for the future of investigative reporting, often seen as the most costly of journalistic forms.”

Goes on to mention Computational Journalism and our (at GA Tech) and recent Duke University’s efforts in this space and few others.

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Paper: ACM Multimedia (2008) “Audio Puzzler: Piecing Together Time-Stamped Speech Transcripts with a Puzzle Game”

October 18th, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in ACM MM, Computational Journalism, Multimedia, Nick Diakopoulos, Papers No Comments »

N. Diakopoulos, K. Luther, I. Essa (2008), “Audio Puzzler: Piecing Together Time-Stamped Speech Transcripts with a Puzzle Game.” In Proceedings of  ACM International Conference on Multimedia 2008. Vancouver, BC, CANANDA  [Project Link]

ABSTRACT

We have developed an audio-based casual puzzle game which produces a time-stamped transcription of spokenapaudio as a by-product of play. Our evaluation of the game indicates that it is both fun and challenging. The transcripts generated using the game are more accurate than those produced using a standard automatic transcription system and the time-stamps of words are within several hundred milliseconds of ground truth.

AddThis Social Bookmark Button