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Paper: Ergonomics in Design (2007), “Designing a Technology Coach”

October 29th, 2007 Irfan Essa Posted in A. Dan Fisk, Activity Recognition, Aware Home, Papers, Wendy Rogers No Comments »

RogerEssaFisk IconFEATURE AT A GLANCE: Technology in the home environment has the potential to support older adults in a variety of ways. We took an interdisciplinary approach (human factors/ergonomics and computer science) to develop a technology “coach” that could support older adults in learning to use a medical device. Our system provided a computer vision system to track the use of a blood glucose meter and provide users with feedback if they made an error. This research could support the development of an in-home personal assistant to coach individuals in a variety of tasks necessary for independent living.

KEYWORDS: home technology, medical devices, support for learning

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Funding: NSF (2001) ITR/SY “The Aware Home: Sustaining the Quality of Life for an Aging Population”

October 1st, 2001 Irfan Essa Posted in Aaron Bobick, Aware Home, Beth Mynatt, Funding, Gregory Abowd, Wendy Rogers No Comments »

Award# 0121661 – ITR/SY: The Aware Home: Sustaining the Quality of Life for an Aging Population

ABSTRACT

The focus of this project is on development of a domestic environment that is cognizant of the whereabouts and activities of its occupants and can support them in their everyday life. While the technology is applicable to a range of domestic situations, the emphasis in this work will be on support for aging in place; through collaboration with experts in assistive care and cognitive aging, the PI and his team will design, demonstrate, and evaluate a series of domestic services that aim to maintain the quality of life for an aging population, with the goal of increasing the likelihood of a “stay at home” alternative to assisted living that satisfies the needs of an aging individual and his/her distributed family. In particular, the PI will explore two areas that are key to sustaining quality of life for an independent senior adult: maintaining familial vigilance, and supporting daily routines. The intention is to serve as an active partner, aiding the senior occupant without taking control. This research will lead to advances in three research areas: human-computer interaction; computational perception; and software engineering. To achieve the desired goals, the PI will conduct the research and experimentation in an authentic domestic setting, a novel research facility called the Residential Laboratory recently completed next to the Georgia Tech campus. Together with experts in theoretical and practical aspects of aging, the PI will establish a pattern of research in which informed design of ubiquitous computing technology can be rapidly deployed, evaluated and evolved in an authentic setting. Special attention will be paid throughout to issues relating to privacy and trust implications. The PI will transition the products of this project to researchers and practitioners interested in performing more large-scale observations of the social and economic impact of Aware Home technologies.

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Paper (1999) in CoBuild: “The Aware Home: A Living Laboratory for Ubiquitous Computing Research”

October 28th, 1999 Irfan Essa Posted in Aware Home, Beth Mynatt, Collaborators, Gregory Abowd, Intelligent Environments, Thad Starner, Wendy Rogers No Comments »

Cory D. Kidd, Robert Orr, Gregory D. Abowd, Christopher G. Atkeson, Irfan A. Essa, Blair MacIntyre, Elizabeth Mynatt, Thad E. Starner and Wendy Newstetter (1999) “The Aware Home: A Living Laboratory for Ubiquitous Computing Research”, In Cooperative Buildings. Integrating Information, Organizations and Architecture , Volume 1670/1999, Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISBN: 978-3-540-66596-0. [PDF | DOI | Project Site]

Abstract

We are building a home, called the Aware Home, to create a living laboratory for research in ubiquitous computing for everyday activities. This paper introduces the Aware Home project and outlines some of our technology-and human-centered research objectives in creating the Aware Home.

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Project: The Aware Home

October 1st, 1999 Irfan Essa Posted in A. Dan Fisk, Aware Home, Beth Mynatt, Gregory Abowd, Intelligent Environments, Projects, Research, Wendy Rogers No Comments »

The Aware Home

Is it possible to create a home environment that is aware of its occupants whereabouts and activities?

If we build such a home, how can it provide services to its residents that enhance their quality of life or help them to maintain independence as they age? The Aware Home Research Initiative (AHRI) is an interdisciplinary research endeavor at Georgia Tech aimed at addressing the fundamental technical, design, and social challenges presented by such questions.

The Aware Home Research Initiative at Georgia Institute of Technology is devoted to the multidisciplinary exploration of emerging technologies adn services based in the home. Starting in 1988, our collection of faculty and students has created a unique research facility that allows us to simulate and evaluate user experiences with off-the-shelf and state-of-the-art technologies. With speciifc expertise in health, education, entertainment and usable security, we are able to apply our research to problems of significant social and economic impact.

New technologies show great promise when applied to the home domain. The opportunities are vast, ranging from new modes of entertainment, services to simplify the management of the home and its myriad activities, and much-needed assistance for individuals at risk and the busy family members who care for them.

Home entertainment is important to help us enjoy our leisure time. We are interested in developingg new ways to simplify the control of a complex array of digital entertainment items and to creat new ways to capture the meaning ful moments of everyday life and share them with others now and well into the future. As we introduce more technologies into the home, we do not want to change the important characteristic of home life; to relax and enjoy family events. Currently, the influx of technology into the home has produced an increased burden to manage that infrastructure and guard against new security threats. by considering the importance of the human experience in managing technology and maintaining control and privacy, we are showing how a state-of-the-art experience can also be an enjoyable one.

Many otherwise busy adults are sandwiched between generations of older and younger relations that rely on them for care. Many baby boomers take responsibility to help an aging parent retain an independent life in his or her own home, rather than moving to an institutional facility. Others are assisting a developmentally delayed child or grandchild grow into an independent life in his or her own hoem, rather than moving to an institutional facility. Others are assisting a developmentally delayed child or grandchild grow into an independent and functional lifestyle. Still others may help a sibling cope with a chronic health condition. Whatever the situation, there are many opportunities for home technologies to support the important communication and coordination tasks a network of formal and informal caregivers. the same technologies that revolutionized and “flattened” the workplace can now make life easier in the home.

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