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Computation + Journalism Symposium 2014

October 25th, 2014 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Events, Nick Diakopoulos No Comments »

Hosted the 3rd Computation + Journalism Symposium 2014 at The Brown Institute for Media Innovation in the Pulitzer Hall, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA, on October 24-25. It was a huge success with about 250 attendees, and mixture of invited panels and contributed papers.  More details below:

Jon Klienberg kicked off the meeting with a very exciting keynote.  Videos of all sessions should be available from the above website.  Next C+J event will be in a year. Stay tuned for more details.  I was the co-organizer of this event with Nick Diakopoulos and Mark Hansen.

 

 

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Computational Journalist Nick Diakopoulos Appointed Assistant Professor at Philip Merrill College of Journalism, U of Maryland

April 2nd, 2014 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, In The News, Nick Diakopoulos No Comments »

Congratulations to my Ph. D. Student Nicholas Diakopoulos and best wishes on his new position.

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Computational journalist Nicholas A. Diakopoulos will be the newest assistant professor at the Philip Merrill College of Journalism. Dean Lucy Dalglish announced the appointment today.

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With a background in computer science and human-computer interaction, Diakopoulos received his Ph.D. from the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech.  He was also a computing innovation fellow at the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers University from 2009-2011.

via Computational Journalist Nick Diakopoulos Appointed Assistant Professor.

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Computation + Journalism Symposium 2013 on Jan 31 – Feb 1, at GA Tech.

January 2nd, 2013 Irfan Essa Posted in Brad Stenger, CnJ, Computational Journalism, Events, Interesting, Nick Diakopoulos No Comments »

Join us for the 2nd Computation + Journalism Symposium 2013 in Atlanta, GA on Jan 31 – Feb 1, 2013

What role does computation have in the practice of journalism today and in the near future? As computer-driven forces like automation and aggregation increasingly alter the role of journalists and journalism in society, how can computation become a force of deliberate, positive social impact in journalism and civic life? Five years after the first Computation and Journalism symposium at Georgia Tech, this event brings together leaders in both journalism and computation to discuss and debate current trends and future opportunities.

Join us for the second Symposium on Computation + Journalism to be held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta on Jan 31, – Feb 1, 2012. Visit this site for additional details.

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N. Diakopoulos PhD Thesis (2009): Collaborative annotation, analysis, and presentation interfaces for digital video”

July 6th, 2009 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Computational Photography and Video, Multimedia, Nick Diakopoulos, PhD, Students No Comments »

Title: Collaborative annotation, analysis, and presentation interfaces for digital video

Author: Diakopoulos, Nicholas A.

Abstract

Information quality corresponds to the degree of excellence in communicating knowledge or intelligence and encompasses aspects of validity, accuracy, reliability, bias, transparency, and comprehensiveness among others. Professional news, public relations, and user generated content alike all have their own subtly different information quality concerns. With so much recent growth in online video, it is also apparent that more and more consumers will be getting their information from online videos and that understanding the information quality of video becomes paramount for a consumer wanting to make decisions based on it.

This dissertation explores the design and evaluation of collaborative video annotation and presentation interfaces as motivated by the desire for better information quality in online video. We designed, built, and evaluated three systems: (1) Audio Puzzler, a puzzle game which as a by-product of play produces highly accurate time-stamped transcripts of video, (2) Videolyzer, a video annotation system designed to aid bloggers and journalists collect, aggregate, and share analyses of information quality of video, and (3) Videolyzer CE, a simplified video annotation presentation which syndicates the knowledge collected using Videolyzer to a wider range of users in order to modulate their perceptions of video information. We contribute to knowledge of different interface methods for collaborative video annotation and to mechanisms for enhancing accuracy of objective metadata such as transcripts as well as subjective notions of information quality of the video itself.

via Collaborative annotation, analysis, and presentation interfaces for digital video.

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Paper (2009) ACM CHI: “Videolyzer: Quality Analysis of Online Informational Video for Bloggers and Journalists”

March 4th, 2009 Irfan Essa Posted in ACM UIST/CHI, Computational Journalism, Computational Photography and Video, Nick Diakopoulos No Comments »

N. Diakopoulos, S. Goldenberg, I. Essa (2009). “Videolyzer: Quality Analysis of Online Informational Video for Bloggers and Journalists.” ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI). April, 2009. [PDF] [Project Site] [Video(CHI 2009 – Digital Life New World – CHI 2009 Advance Program)

Abstract

Screen Shot of Videolyzer

Tools to aid people in making sense of the information quality of online informational video are essential for media consumers seeking to be well informed. Our application, Videolyzer, addresses the information quality problem in video by allowing politically motivated bloggers or journalists to analyze, collect, and share criticisms of the information quality of online political videos. Our interface innovates by providing a fine-grained and tightly coupled interaction paradigm between the timeline, the time-synced transcript, and annotations. We also incorporate automatic textual and video content analysis to suggest areas of interest for further assessment by a person. We present an evaluation of Videolyzer looking at the user experience, usefulness, and behavior around the novel features of the UI as well as report on the collaborative dynamic of the discourse generated with the tool.
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Paper: ACM Multimedia (2008) “Audio Puzzler: Piecing Together Time-Stamped Speech Transcripts with a Puzzle Game”

October 18th, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in ACM MM, Computational Journalism, Multimedia, Nick Diakopoulos, Papers No Comments »

N. Diakopoulos, K. Luther, I. Essa (2008), “Audio Puzzler: Piecing Together Time-Stamped Speech Transcripts with a Puzzle Game.” In Proceedings of  ACM International Conference on Multimedia 2008. Vancouver, BC, CANANDA  [Project Link]

ABSTRACT

We have developed an audio-based casual puzzle game which produces a time-stamped transcription of spokenapaudio as a by-product of play. Our evaluation of the game indicates that it is both fun and challenging. The transcripts generated using the game are more accurate than those produced using a standard automatic transcription system and the time-stamps of words are within several hundred milliseconds of ground truth.

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Research: Videolyzer (Online DEMO, try it out!)

October 15th, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in Collaborators, Computational Journalism, Nick Diakopoulos, Projects No Comments »

An Online DEMO of Videolyzer, a project by my PhD Student, Nick Diakopolous.

Videolyzer is a tool designed to help journalists and bloggers collect, organize, and present information about the quality (i.e. validity, reliability, etc.) of online videos. It makes it possible to evaluate and make sense of things like comments, claims, and sources as they relate to the video. Users can comment and annotate pieces of the video (called “anchors”) to provide a more fine-grained description of the information in the video. The interface also incorporates a tightly integrated transcript of what’s spoken in the video to make it easier to navigate the dense information there. Finally, Videolyzer allows for collaboration among many people. Users can build off of each other’s annotations and rate each other in a form of distributed vetting and peer-evaluation.

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Paper: Pragmatic Web (2008) “An Annotation Model for Making Sense of Information Quality in Online Videos”

September 28th, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Multimedia, Nick Diakopoulos, Papers No Comments »

N. Diakopoulos, I. Essa. (2008) “An Annotation Model for Making Sense of Information Quality in Online Videos.” Proceedings of the International Conference on the Pragmatic Web. 28–30 Sept. 2008, Uppsala, Sweden (To Appear)

ABSTRACT

Making sense of the information quality of online media including things such as the accuracy and validity of claims and the reliability of sources is essential for people to be well-informed. We are developing Videolyzer to address the challenge of information quality sense-making by allowing motivated individuals to analyze, collect, share, and respond to criticisms of the information quality of online political videos and their transcripts. In this paper specifically we present a model of how the annotation ontology and collaborative dynamics embedded in Videolyzer can enhance information quality.

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Research: Audio Puzzler Alpha

August 7th, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Nick Diakopoulos No Comments »

Audio Puzzler Alpha (ONLINE DEMO)

By Nick Diakopoulos (My PhD Student)

Audio Puzzler is a new kind of puzzle game based on unauthored content found online. The audio for the puzzles is taken from popular or interesting video clips from different genres such as news, documentary, or television. The audio puzzler is the type of game that harnesses people’s play to also provide valuable data which enriches the content played with. This is in the same vein as the ESPGame, the Listen Game, and PhotoPlay, which are all games which gather data in the process of game play. But while the data collected by these other games is useful for machine learning, the data collected with audio puzzler is immediately valuable as a transcription of the speech in the video. A similar effort (but in a much grander domain) is the Fold It project which seeks to harness playtime to solve protein folding problems. Much more detailed information about the evaluation of the technology will be forthcoming in a paper to be published at ACM Multimedia in October.

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Event: Journalism 3G The Future of Technology in the Field

February 23rd, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Events, Nick Diakopoulos No Comments »

Journalism 3G: The Future of Technology in the Field (A Symposium on Computation and Journalism) was a huge success. CJ Logo

  • We had over 230 registered attendees. Thanks to all participants, panelists, and speakers.
  • Use our Social Network (http://cj.crowdvine.com/) to continue the conversation.
  • Join the FACEBOOK group (http://git.facebook.com/group.php?gid=18427444784)
  • Use the tag “CnJ” on all blog posts and photo/video posts on the web, so we can collect them
  • Videos of the event are now available here.

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