Paper in IEEE CVPR 2013 “Decoding Children’s Social Behavior”

June 27th, 2013 Irfan Essa Posted in Affective Computing, Behavioral Imaging, Denis Lantsman, Gregory Abowd, James Rehg, PAMI/ICCV/CVPR/ECCV, Papers, Thomas Ploetz No Comments »

  • J. M. Rehg, G. D. Abowd, A. Rozga, M. Romero, M. A. Clements, S. Sclaroff, I. Essa, O. Y. Ousley, Y. Li, C. Kim, H. Rao, J. C. Kim, L. L. Presti, J. Zhang, D. Lantsman, J. Bidwell, and Z. Ye (2013), “Decoding Children’s Social Behavior,” in Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), 2013. [PDF] [WEBSITE] [DOI] [BIBTEX]
    @InProceedings{    2013-Rehg-DCSB,
      author  = {James M. Rehg and Gregory D. Abowd and Agata Rozga
          and Mario Romero and Mark A. Clements and Stan
          Sclaroff and Irfan Essa and Opal Y. Ousley and Yin
          Li and Chanho Kim and Hrishikesh Rao and Jonathan C.
          Kim and Liliana Lo Presti and Jianming Zhang and
          Denis Lantsman and Jonathan Bidwell and Zhefan Ye},
      booktitle  = {{Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Computer Vision
          and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)}},
      doi    = {10.1109/CVPR.2013.438},
      month    = {June},
      organization  = {IEEE Computer Society},
      pdf    = {http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~rehg/Papers/Rehg_CVPR13.pdf},
      title    = {Decoding Children's Social Behavior},
      url    = {http://www.cbi.gatech.edu/mmdb/},
      year    = {2013}
    }

Abstract

We introduce a new problem domain for activity recognition: the analysis of children’s social and communicative behaviors based on video and audio data. We specifically target interactions between children aged 1-2 years and an adult. Such interactions arise naturally in the diagnosis and treatment of developmental disorders such as autism. We introduce a new publicly-available dataset containing over 160 sessions of a 3-5 minute child-adult interaction. In each session, the adult examiner followed a semi-structured play interaction protocol which was designed to elicit a broad range of social behaviors. We identify the key technical challenges in analyzing these behaviors, and describe methods for decoding the interactions. We present experimental results that demonstrate the potential of the dataset to drive interesting research questions, and show preliminary results for multi-modal activity recognition.

Full database available from http://www.cbi.gatech.edu/mmdb/

via IEEE Xplore – Decoding Children’s Social Behavior.

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Paper (2009) In ACM Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics “Human Video Textures”

March 1st, 2009 Irfan Essa Posted in ACM SIGGRAPH, Atsushi Nakazawa, Computational Photography and Video, James Rehg, Matt Flagg, Modeling and Animation, Papers, Sing Bing Kang No Comments »

 

Matthew FlaggAtsushi Nakazawa, Qiushuang Zhang, Sing Bing Kang, Young Kee Ryu, Irfan EssaJames M. Rehg (2009), Human Video Textures In Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics and Games 2009 (I3D ’09), Boston, MA, February 27-March 1 (Fri-Sun), 2009 [PDF (see Copyright) | Video in DiVx | Website ]

Abstract

This paper describes a data-driven approach for generating photorealistic animations of human motion. Each animation sequence follows a user-choreographed path and plays continuously by seamlessly transitioning between different segments of the captured data. To produce these animations, we capitalize on the complementary characteristics of motion capture data and video. We customize our capture system to record motion capture data that are synchronized with our video source. Candidate transition points in video clips are identified using a new similarity metric based on 3-D marker trajectories and their 2-D projections into video. Once the transitions have been identified, a video-based motion graph is constructed. We further exploit hybrid motion and video data to ensure that the transitions are seamless when generating animations. Motion capture marker projections serve as control points for segmentation of layers and nonrigid transformation of regions. This allows warping and blending to generate seamless in-between frames for animation. We show a series of choreographed animations of walks and martial arts scenes as validation of our approach.

Example Image from Project

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Paper (2009): ICASSP “Learning Basic Units in American Sign Language using Discriminative Segmental Feature Selection”

February 4th, 2009 Irfan Essa Posted in 0205507, Face and Gesture, ICASSP, James Rehg, Machine Learning, Pei Yin, Thad Starner No Comments »

Pei Yin, Thad Starner, Harley Hamilton, Irfan Essa, James M. Rehg (2009), “Learning Basic Units in American Sign Language using Discriminative Segmental Feature Selection” in IEEE Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing 2009 (ICASSP 2009). Session: Spoken Language Understanding I, Tuesday, April 21, 11:00 – 13:00, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

The natural language for most deaf signers in the United States is American Sign Language (ASL). ASL has internal structure like spoken languages, and ASL linguists have introduced several phonemic models. The study of ASL phonemes is not only interesting to linguists, but also useful for scalability in recognition by machines. Since machine perception is different than human perception, this paper learns the basic units for ASL directly from data. Comparing with previous studies, our approach computes a set of data-driven units (fenemes) discriminatively from the results of segmental feature selection. The learning iterates the following two steps: first apply discriminative feature selection segmentally to the signs, and then tie the most similar temporal segments to re-train. Intuitively, the sign parts indistinguishable to machines are merged to form basic units, which we call ASL fenemes. Experiments on publicly available ASL recognition data show that the extracted data-driven fenemes are meaningful, and recognition using those fenemes achieves improved accuracy at reduced model complexity

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Paper: ICASSP (2008) “Discriminative Feature Selection for Hidden Markov Models using Segmental Boosting”

April 3rd, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in 0205507, Face and Gesture, Funding, James Rehg, Machine Learning, PAMI/ICCV/CVPR/ECCV, Papers, Pei Yin, Thad Starner No Comments »

Pei Yin, Irfan Essa, James Rehg, Thad Starner (2008) “Discriminative Feature Selection for Hidden Markov Models using Segmental Boosting”, ICASSP 2008 – March 30 – April 4, 2008 – Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.A. (Paper: MLSP-P3.D8, Session: Pattern Recognition and Classification II, Time: Thursday, April 3, 15:30 – 17:30, Topic: Machine Learning for Signal Processing: Learning Theory and Modeling) (PDF|Project Site)

ABSTRACT

icassp08We address the feature selection problem for hidden Markov models (HMMs) in sequence classification. Temporal correlation in sequences often causes difficulty in applying feature selection techniques. Inspired by segmental k-means segmentation (SKS), we propose Segmentally Boosted HMMs (SBHMMs), where the state-optimized features are constructed in a segmental and discriminative manner. The contributions are twofold. First, we introduce a novel feature selection algorithm, where the temporal dynamics are decoupled from the static learning procedure by assuming that the sequential data are piecewise independent and identically distributed. Second, we show that the SBHMM consistently improves traditional HMM recognition in various domains. The reduction of error compared to traditional HMMs ranges from 17% to 70% in American Sign Language recognition, human gait identification, lip reading, and speech recognition.

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Paper: J. Parallel Distrib. Computing (2005): “Experiences with optimizing two stream-based applications for cluster execution”

September 30th, 2006 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Photography and Video, James Rehg, Kishore Ramachandran, Papers, Research No Comments »

Experiences with optimizing two stream-based applications for cluster execution Angelov, Y., Ramachandran, U., Mackenzie, K., Rehg, J. M., and Essa, I. 2005. “Experiences with optimizing two stream-based applications for cluster execution”. J. Parallel Distrib. Comput. 65, 6 (Jun. 2005), 678-691. [DOI]

Abstract

We explore optimization strategies and resulting performance of two stream-based video applications, video texture and color tracker, on a cluster of SMPs. The two applications are representative of a class of emerging applications, which we call “stream-based applications”, that are sensitive to both latency of individual results and overall throughput. Such applications require non-trivial parallelization techniques in order to improve both latency and throughput, given that the stream data emanates from a limited set of sources (exactly one in the two applications studied) and that the distribution of the data cannot be done a priori.We suggest techniques that address in a coordinated fashion the problems of data distribution and work partitioning. We believe the two problems are related and need to be addressed together. We have parallelized two applications using the Stampede cluster programming system that provides abstractions for implementing time-and throughput-sensitive applications elegantly and efficiently. For the Video Textures application we show that we can achieve a speedup of 24.26 on a 112 processor cluster. For the Color Tracker application, where latency is more crucial, we identify the extent of data parallelism that ensures that the slowest member of the pipeline is no longer the bottleneck for achieving a decent frame rate.

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